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We would like to send a huge thank you to Anheuser-Busch and the National Volunteer Fire Council for the donation of 2 pallets of canned drinking water to keep our crews hydrated! And thank you to DeB...
Friday, August 27th, 2021
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Today is a GREAT Day! Notification has just been made by FEMA, that The Gallatin-Sunnyside VFD has been awarded the Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) for Fiscal Grant Year 2020 to replace our out...
Friday, March 26th, 2021
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In August 2020, we were notified by the FEMA Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program that we were awarded a grant to replace our 1968 Kaiser Jeep 6x6 5-Ton Brush Truck that was converted from a milit...
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Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic and the need for social distancing when we are not called to an Emergency, our monthly business meeting was held via conference call. During our meeting we acknowledged Ca...
Fire Safety Fall/Winter

Fall/Winter Fire Safety Info

The threat of winter fires is real. Use these statistics to help your community understand how severe these fires can be.

  • 890 people die in winter home fires each year.
  • $2 billion in property loss occurs each year from winter home fires.
  • Winter home fires account for only 8 percent of the total number of fires in the U.S., but result in 30 percent of all fire deaths.
  • Cooking is the leading cause of all winter home fires.
  • A heat source too close to combustibles is the leading factor contributing to the start of a winter home fire (15 percent).
  • 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. is the most common time for winter home fires.

Source: National Fire Incident Reporting System 2010-2012

Facts about home heating fires

  • From 2013-2015, an average of 45,900 home heating fires occurred in the United States each year. These fires caused an annual average of approximately 205 deaths, 725 injuries and $506 million in property loss.
  • Heating was the second leading cause of home fires after cooking.
  • Home heating fires peaked in the early evening hours between 5 and 9 p.m. with the highest peak between 6 and 8 p.m. This four-hour period accounted for 29 percent of all home heating fires.
  • Home heating fires peaked in January (21 percent) and declined to the lowest point from June to August.
  • Confined fires — fires confined to chimneys, flues or fuel burners — accounted for 75 percent of home heating fires.
  • Twenty-nine percent of the nonconfined home heating fires — fires that spread past the object of origin — happened because the heat source (like a space heater or fire place) was too close to things that can burn.

Source: Heating Fires in Residential Buildings (2013-2015) PDF 713 KB

What is carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the “Invisible Killer” because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. More than 150 people in the Unites States die every year from accidental nonfire-related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including generators. Other products include faulty, improperly-used or incorrectly-vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Source: Consumer Product Safety Commission

Know the symptoms of CO poisoning

Source: Consumer Product Safety Commission

Because CO is odorless, colorless, and otherwise undetectable to the human senses, people may not know that they are being exposed. The initial symptoms of low to moderate CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They include:

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

High level CO poisoning results in progressively more severe symptoms, including:

  • Mental confusion
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of muscular coordination
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Ultimately death

 


© 2022 Gallatin Sunnyside Volunteer Fire Department